Stop Gender Based Violence In South Africa

 

What solutions to GBV (gender based violence) in South Africa exist? "OK, this is where I'll draw a line. There are always different perspectives on gender-based-violence, yes. But I do not condone it. Nor do people whom I know." These were President Cyril Ramaphosa's sentiments towards dealing with GBV in South Africa following the footage of Inkonjane Primary School pupil Hlophe speaking about her experiences of sexual harassment.
Gender based violence is a crime. The South African Police Service we need everybody to come on board to help fight this crime. This crime affects everyone, so it's time to stop talking and start acting. If you are experiencing any of the following forms of abuse, please get help by contacting the police or social workers at your nearest police station.
This article will explore why these sentiments are problematic to defeating this issue and we will explore possible solutions.
What does gender based violence mean?

Gender based violence is any act committed against a person on the basis of their gender.
It includes rape, physical and sexual assault, emotional abuse, and discrimination.
  • Gender based violence can be perpetrated by individuals, groups of people or even institutions. The problem of Gender Based Violence (GBV) cannot be sidelined as a social ill to be dealt with.
  • Domestic violence and emotional abuse are some of the most prevailing forms of GBV in South Africa.
  • Abuse, neglect, or violation of someone's rights feel too often and for too long.
  • GBV has almost always been a problem in society, but it is now being recognized more keenly than ever before.
  • GBV does not only mean physical abuse, it also means emotional abuse and verbal abuse.
  • Emotional manipulation is a form of psychological violence that occurs when one person tries to dominate another mentally through verbal assaults on their sense of self-worth or ability to think clearly, or by isolating them from social support or other sources of strength who might provide an alternative perspective.
  • Physical abuse is physical violence, such as hitting, kicking or pushing. It can also be sexual assault or rape.
  • Physical abuse is a serious crime that should never be tolerated. If you see someone being physically abused in any way, report it to the police immediately.
  • Emotional abuse. It's what we do to each other when we don't know how to deal with our feelings, or when things are so bad that we think it's easier not to deal with them at all. It can be as subtle as name-calling, putting someone down, negative body language and trying to make the other person feel guilty for something they didn’t do. Or it can be as sinister as showing jealousy over another person, using your past against you in the present – even making you feel like you are crazy because of how much control they have over your life!
  • Emotional abuse is any behaviour that makes another person feel bad about themselves or like they aren't good enough; it’s also blaming someone else instead of taking responsibility for yourself and your actions (or lack thereof).
Psychological abuse is any behaviour that emotionally hurts a person. It can be carried out in many different ways, including:
  • Insults and name calling;
  • Put downs;
  • Humiliation;
  • Shaming or guilt tripping (which may involve making you feel bad about yourself);
  • Withholding affection or attention as punishment;
  • Controlling behaviour (such as an excessive need for reassurance or controlling your appearance);
  • Intimidation through threatening to harm you physically or psychologically.
We can have a greater impact on those who sexually abuse women if we educate them on how their behavior is anathema with what feminists believe and teach them that they need to be better. 
The problem of Gender Based Violence (GBV) cannot be sidelined as a social ill to be dealt with. Domestic violence and emotional abuse are some of the most prevailing forms of GBV in South Africa. Abuse, neglect, or violation of someone's rights feel too often and for too long. GBV has almost always been a problem in society, but it is now being recognized more keenly than ever before.
It is important to include sections such as these to continue the conversation on matters of domestic violence and what can be done to protect those affected by it : 
  • Stricter legislation needs to be enforced in order to better promote governmental support on an issue such as this.
  • There could also be more seminars or conferences that promote these ideas in order to educate people.
  • Women are frequently subjected to violence and it starts in childhood and self-esteem is sorely impacted on carrying this violence over into relationships.
  • Gender-based violence remains a significant problem, with an estimated one in three women experiencing physical or sexual violence from intimate partners in their lifetime, and statistics showing that few cases are reported.
  • Domestic abuse continues to be one of the most common forms of emotional oppression worldwide.
Gender based violence is a crime. Report to police and get help.
You can report gender based violence to the police, or you can go to a hospital or clinic for medical attention. You do not need to be in physical pain for reporting; even if no physical evidence is left, it’s still important to report your experience because this helps build a case against the perpetrator and show that they are likely guilty of other crimes as well.
There are many different organizations that provide assistance with legal challenges related to gender-based violence and sexual assault :
The South African Police Service (SAPS)
The Department of Justice & Constitutional Development (DoJCD)
National Prosecuting Authority (NPA)

 

Conclusion
But you can stop this from happening. Report any case of violence to the police and seek help immediately before it gets out of hand! 

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